Lynton's cover image
Lynton

Lynton FOSTER

Year of Award: 2008 Award State: Tasmania Trades > Food Production
The Jack Green Churchill Fellowship to study artisanal farmhouse cheesemaking techniques particularly the application of microfiltration technology - France, Ireland, U.K.
Download

I now live at Eaglehawk Neck on the Tasman Peninsula, a place I have always loved and always felt a part of since my grandfather built our shack here in 1960. I work at Port Arthur Historic Site, where I have an absorbing and intriguing new job. I wear many hats – as a guide, a visitor services assistant and a driver of mobility- impaired visitors in a vehicle called a Wombat. I chat all day to overseas visitors, locals and interstate tourists, and I love it.

I love living in the country: the local market, the fishing, walking the beach with my dog. I have lots of friends and have thrown myself into local groups like Rotary and ENACT (the Eaglehawk Neck action group). It was set up following the devastating 2013 bushfires; we concentrate on tourism and local community projects. We have built and installed picnic tables, we bother politicians and government officials, and we have set up a website and improved the signage. I represented us at a Legislative Council Select Committee into built heritage in Tasmania, where we secured recommendations for funding for the Port Arthur Historic Site Management Authority to take over the historic site precinct for the dog line and the Officers’ Mess at Eaglehawk Neck. (This is the oldest wooden military building in Australia, and has sadly fallen into disrepair.)

I have discovered and followed my passions here, and I can now understand better the sense of belonging to a place which indigenous Australians feel. It is an important developmental stage we should all go through.

The challenge for tourism in this part of the world is to provide visitors with a reason to stay a few days on the Peninsula instead of ‘doing Port Arthur’ in a day. I look forward to throwing myself into this community, and perhaps lending my skills to a future for such an iconic and beautiful part of Australia. I think a Peninsula Food Trail is a must, expanding the tourism based on Port Arthur to benefit this small, vibrant community.

I recall on my Fellowship journey through Ireland reading a book called Eating the Scenery. It was a blueprint for those wanting to survive in the remote Southwest of Ireland. The title comes from a local saying: ‘You can’t eat the scenery’ – an acknowledgment that survival in these beautiful, remote parts of the world is tough, and demands the use of all of your creativity, resources and adaptive abilities. Perhaps my future lies somewhere in tourism-based food in this area, and my challenge will be to bring all I have learned, all I have experienced, to the table.

Excerpt from “Bringing Knowledge Home” published by the Churchill Fellows Association of Tasmania (2016) 

Related fellows
Anthony Femia, Anthony
Trades > Food Production
2012
Adam James, Adam
Trades > Food Production
2016
Cameron Matthews, Cameron
Trades > Food Production
2016
Ben Wall, Ben
Trades > Food Production
2016
Hazel MacTavish-West, Hazel
Trades > Food Production
2017
Sarah May, Sarah
Trades > Food Production
2017
Philip JONES, Philip
2001
Diane LIGHTFOOT, Diane
2001
Jason OLSEN, Jason
2001
Peter O'REAGAIN, Peter
2001