CHANGING PERCEPTIONS IN THE AUSTRALIAN BEEF INDUSTRY

5 Oct 2018

Rachael Cruwys

 

In Australia, Brahman cattle have the ability to withstand harsh climates, which has seen the breed transform the North Australian beef industry. However, their hardiness has led to many domestic consumers believing the breed to be more tough and less palatable than others, which in turn perpetuates price discrimination against Brahman cattle at saleyards and meat processing plants.

Rachael Cruwys, a Capella local and Stud Principle in Central Queensland, has received a Churchill Fellowship because of her motivation to increase the domestic marketability of Brahman cattle through improved marketing and genetics. 

Rachael will travel to Texas and Florida, the US States well acclaimed for breeding Brahman cattle, to study their marketing techniques and strategies, and apply them back here in Australia. 

Rachael, whose family have been breeding Brahman cattle since the 1950s after they were introduced commercially to Queensland, breeds commercial and stud herds of purebred Brahman cattle. 

“Through the Fellowship, I hope to increase the exposure of Brahman beef through improving its marketability and ending the marginalisation that the breed is subject to in saleyards and meat processing plants,” said Rachael.

“I am looking forward to visiting ranches in the US which are known for their longevity of breeding Brahman cattle. Collectively these studs and their cattles genetics make a positive contribution to the commercial cattle industry worldwide, producing functional, fertile and performance driven cattle.

“I intend to bring back knowledge about the selection tools that American Brahman breeders use and how these correlate with improving carcass traits, and the marketing strategies the breed is currently using to ensure they are achieving comparable market prices.”  

“This is a terrific opportunity for Rachael to learn new skills and gain further knowledge to positively change perceptions about the capabilities of the Brahman breed to fulfil consumer demands,” said Adam Davey, CEO of the Winston Churchill Memorial Trust.  

“Rachael is clearly passionate about her cause and we are excited to see how Rachael will apply her new knowledge to improve the marketability of Brahman cattle here in Australia.” 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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