ARTISAN PRODUCERS

Saturday 15th May 2021 – 11.00-12.45

Moderator

LEEANNE BOND 

Leeanne Bond is a prominent engineering leader, passionate about project governance, innovation and entrepreneurship, gender equity and workplace diversity and inclusion. 

Leeanne is currently the independent non-executive chair of Mining3 and is a non-executive director of ASX listed Synertec Corporation Limited (ASX:SOP), Aurecon Group, Snowy Hydro Limited, Clean Energy Finance Corporation and QADO Group.  Leeanne has over 30 years corporate experience including as a professional company director and board member. Leeanne has a Bachelor of Chemical Engineering and MBA from The University of Queensland, is an Honorary Fellow of Engineers Australia and a Fellow of the Australian Academy of Technology and Engineering. She was the first female President of Engineers Australia in Queensland in 2002 and was named Australian Professional Engineer of the Year in 2007. She is a Fellow of the Australian Institute of Company Directors and a Member of Chief Executive Women. 

Leeanne sponsors a scholarship for a first year female engineering student at The University of Queensland and is currently Chair of Chemeca – the annual chemical engineering conference in Australia and New Zealand – to be held in September 2021. She is a Queensland regional selector for Winston Churchill Fellowships and for Rhodes Scholarships. She is a passionate artist and contemporary jeweller and has recently opened a gallery for emerging artists. She has a 13 year old daughter.

Guest Speakers

TREVOR HART

SUBJECT: MOZZARELLA & CLIMATE CHANGE

Trevor Hart (2014) is cheesemaker who views his practise as high craft. Cheeses and butters are made in bowls, the entire process by hand. His work has been recognised in winning the delicious produce awards twice and being a finalist for 7 consecutive years. 

Trevor is also a practising jazz musician and composer. “The willingness to experiment, to improvise and to accept failure as a natural part of the process in attaining a quality product.” Art and craft inform each other.  Trevor aspires to produce product that is recognised and consumed by his community. “For millennia cheese has been made as a small scale local enterprise and I aim to continue this.”

Cheesemaking is a practice as old as civilisation. Within the last 2 generations it has lost the way it was practise for millennia. The effect of climate change on supply and quality of the milk source presents a great challenge for the artisan cheesemaker.

JOHN ARNFIELD

SUBJECT: THE HUGE CHANGE IN THE BAKING INDUSTRY OVER 60 YEARS

John Arnfield (1999) started in the baking industry as a 13 year old apprentice at Penny’s Bakery (later G.J. Coles) in Fortitude Valley, Brisbane in 1951.

John held various positions within the industry including owning two bakeries, State Manager of an International Bakery Ingredient Company, Production Manager of a very large food factory, and Bakery Manager of the Biggest Supermarket Bakery in Queensland. 

John’s Fellowship was in 1999 when he studied at the Chorleywood Food Research Institute in the UK the very latest advanced in bread production which I brought back to Australia and is now used in the majority of large production bread bakeries.

CRAIG HARDNER

SUBJECT: MACADAMIA NUTS

Dr Craig Hardner (2012) is a Senior Research Fellow in quantitative genetics and tree breeding at The University of Queensland. His main research themes are conservation genetics of Australian trees and quantitative genetics of perennial horticultural and forestry crops.

Craig is a world authority on the genetics and domestication history of macadamia; an indigenous Queensland tree that has been developed as a high value tree nut crop. Dr Hardner currently works with domestic and international breeding of macadamia, almond, mango, apple, peach, cherry, strawberry, eucalypts and sugar cane.

ELAINE BRADLEY

SUBJECT: FOOD SECURITY & EMERGING SMALL-SCALE FOOD SUPPLY NETWORKS

Elaine Bradley (2012) has worked in community-based farm and food co-operatives in Queensland’s Mary Valley since moving there more than 25 years ago.  Previously she worked in community support roles in Western Australia, and before that in biological research.

In 2012, Elaine used her Churchill Fellowship to investigate rural communities in the United States that have rebuilt local economies by supporting networks of small farmers working together. Elaine is currently the operations manager of the Mary Valley Country Harvest Co-operative, as well as running her own family’s market garden.